HH Karmapa Video Stanford University

Karmapa Video Stanford University, CCARE

As we shared earlier, His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, head of the Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, spoke at Stanford University’s Memorial Auditorium on March 17, 2015 on “Caring Connections: Compassion, Technology and the Environment.” We hope you enjoy this video of His Holiness’ Stanford teaching in its entirety.

The dialogue with His Holiness was hosted by Dr. James Doty of CCARE, Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altrusim Research Education.

At the end of the talk, the Karmapa presented Stanford University with a beautiful Tibetan thangka painting of Avalokiteshvara, the representation of ultimate compassion. Dr. Doty presented His Holiness was presented with a Stanford tee shirt. Nalandabodhi’s Mitra Dean Tyler Dewar served as translator for His Holiness.

His Holiness is head of the 900-year-old Karma Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, guiding millions of Buddhists worldwide.  At 14, the Karmapa made a dramatic escape from Tibet and took refuge in India, and temporarily resides at Gyuto Monastery. His Holiness Karmapa is a globally recognized environmental leader, leading a movement for eco-sustainability practices in over 55 monasteries throughout the Himalayas.  The Karmapa recently announced that he will establish full ordination for women within the Kagyu lineage.

His  Holiness Karmapa’s latest book is The Heart is Noble: Changing the World from the Inside Out, based on the Karmapa’s interactions with American university students.

Explore More Posts

Compassion

Kindness Deconstructed

In Ponlop Rinpoche’s latest article, he teaches us that the most practical, everyday way of working to increase kindness in this world, is to work with the opposites of loving kindness, with our habitual patterns and disturbing emotions. Great compassion involves great risk. You have to leap.

Read More >
Emotions

Before You Send that Angry Email

Watch Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche give a concise teaching from his book Emotional Rescue. Rinpoche reminds us that when dealing with the emotion of anger, it is oftentimes a good idea to take a mindful gap before acting.

Read More >
Buddhism

Compassion 101

Often when we talk about compassion we ask, “How I can increase my compassion?” And the Buddhist teachings do say that we need to expand our compassion. But practically speaking, we need to increase our resilience and our heedfulness.

Read More >