4th Annual Tara Drupchen in Seattle

Nalandabodhi International joyfully announces the fourth annual Tara Drupchen to be held in Seattle, Washington on September 20-22, 2019.

In all wisdom traditions, including Buddhism, it is said that the antidote to fear is loving-kindness. In Vajrayana Buddhism, the figure of Tara symbolizes loving-kindness and compassion — and a strong resolve to dispel the fears of all beings.

The Nalandabodhi sangha, founded and guided by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, will be engaged in a practice intensive focused on awakening the fearless and compassionate energy that is our mind’s true nature, as symbolized by Tara. This practice intensive will be led by our senior Nalandabodhi acharyas and lamas, and will be joined by participants from around the world.

What is a “drupchen”?

Drupchen (Tibetan: སྒྲུབ་ཆེན་ ; literally, “great practice [gathering]” or “great accomplishment [gathering]”) is a traditional format for a practice-intensive retreat in the Vajrayana tradition. The practice of Drupchen is said to bring great benefit to its participants and the communities around them. In this way it is a strong generator of merit, purification, and blessings. It is a powerful method for dispelling obstacles and hindrances for ourselves and our sangha’s dharma activities.

See our BLOG about 2018 Tara Drupchen

How can I make prayer requests and offerings?

You can make an offering in honor of those who are ill, recently passed away, or for any challenge you or others face, or aspiration you have for the world. These prayer requests and aspirations will be shared with our Nalandabodhi teachers and sangha participating in the Drupchen, as well as those participating in related Tara Practice at our centers and study groups around the world. As an act of generosity and auspicious connection, it is a time-honored practice to make a monetary offering to accompany a prayer request. A suggested minimum donation is $10.

Making offerings to sponsor a Drupchen creates a connection to the practice that enables us to accumulate merit and dispel obstacles, even if we are not able to personally attend. Your donation will provide the offerings of candles, flowers, and food; make the necessary preparations for the ritual ceremonies; provide offerings to our teachers in gratitude for sharing this practice with all of us; and support the ongoing dharma activities of Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche and our Nalandabodhi sangha.

 

How can I attend?

 While attendance is free, we ask that you please RSVP as a kindness to the organizers.

Each of the three days will be a day-long session, but people may also join on a drop-in basis. Stay tuned for a detailed schedule.

How can I volunteer?

Many Mindful Activity roles are needed!

When you register, you will be directed to a Mindful Activity preference form to fill out. All participants are encouraged to participate in a Mindful Activity.

Contact: toc@nalandawest.org with any questions.

Click HERE to fill out the form about mindful activities for the weekend if you missed it during registration.

 

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