Essential Meditation - Nalandabodhi International
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Essential Meditation

Monday nights online, 6:30-8:00 PM Eastern Time
Taught by Mitch Owen, Nalandabodhi New York

Nalandabodhi New York (NBNY) is offering “Essential Meditation” a 9-week series on Mondays, from 6:30 – 8:00 PM beginning on May 18.  Essential Meditation introduces and explores techniques of calm-abiding (shamatha) meditation. Through this type of meditation practice, we develop a fundamental sense of getting to know our minds which over time leads to qualities of peace, joy, and the ability to be at ease in any situation.

This class is meant for those who are new to meditation as well as those who would like to reconnect with or reinforce their personal meditation practice. Class meetings will run for 9 weeks and will alternate between presentations (philosophy and technique, with discussion) and practice (meditation sessions with time for questions).

No experience required and all traditions are welcome.

As times and incomes are uncertain at the moment, this course is being offered by donation, and no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Registration will be required for this offering in order to receive the Zoom link. To register or for more information, please contact Mitch Owen.

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Prajñā does not refer to passive knowledge, such as knowing stuff on Wikipedia or knowing how to get from Vancouver to Halifax. Prajñā is the active inquisitiveness of our mind, its basic curiosity of wanting to find out how things really are. If we look at the Buddha’s own career, this is exactly how he started. He did not start with the answers or by following some religion, tradition, or code of behaviour. He started with questions. As Prince Siddhārtha he lived in his sheltered existence in the palace of his parents, who wished to protect him from the bad world (as most parents do). However, eventually he got out with his charioteer and saw things he had never seen before, such as an old person. He asked his charioteer, “What is that?” “This is an old person.” “Does this happen to everyone?” “Yes, even to you.” The same exchange took place when Siddhārtha saw a dying person and a sick person. When he finally saw a meditator under a tree, the charioteer explained, “This guy tries to overcome all the problems that you saw before.” Every time, Siddhārtha realized, “I do not really know what is going on here,” so he tried to find out, which is now known as the Buddhist path.

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